COVID-19 Safety and Travel Information for Yukon First Nations Communities
CYFN Update

COVID-19 BULLETIN BOARD

Quick Links

Here are some THINGS TO KNOW if you have Covid-19 right now.

📌 IT'S NOT YOUR FAULT
- This variant is very contagious.

- It's possible to become infected by someone who isn't symptomatic.

- The BA.2 variant is surviving much longer on surfaces than other strains.

📌 TESTING
- Using a rapid-antigen test will be most effective 2 - 4 days after your symptoms begin.

📌 GET A PCR TEST
- If you are eligible for a PCR test, get one. This lab-verified record provides proof of a past infection; helpful for travel or further healthcare.

📌 INFECTIOUS PERIOD
- You were likely infectious/contagious 2 days before you noticed your symptoms.

- You are not required to notify your close contacts BUT it's a good idea and a kindness.

- Vulnerable people who have been in contact with you, SHOULD definitely be advised.

📌 PLEASE TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF
- Symptoms can last 14 days. Even for mild cases and for fully vaccinated Yukoners.

- Resting is very IMPORTANT. Rest while you feel sick or fatigued and avoid overexertion when you start to feel better.

📌 TIMING
- Stay home for 7 days from the beginning of your symptoms.

- Wait 3 months to get your first or next Booster dose.

❓If you are concerned or worried about your symptoms or have questions about your condition, PLEASE CALL YOUR HEALTH CENTRE or seek medical care.
...

It's good for our mental health to connect, to gather and to celebrate.

Here's a list of 10 Tips to make it safer to do so... and not just on Mother's Day.

1. Stay home when you're sick. Even if your symptoms are mild.

2. Gather outdoors if you can. It's the lowest risk way to spend time with others.

3. Wear a mask, especially if you're gathering with vulnerable people. Elders, the unvaccinated, the immunocompromised and people who live in community settings need extra protection.

4. Plan to visit (especially Elders) in larger and well-ventilated spaces.

5. Keep your groups small. Limiting group size allows you to easily inform guests if transmission occurs.

6. Being vaccinated and boosted reduces the risk of severe illness and hospitalization, if you or your guests contract the virus.

7. Take a rapid test before you gather; it could help uncover a symptom-free infection (that still makes you contagious to others).

8. Wash your hands often. Use hand sanitizer before and after coming into contact with surfaces and objects in public places.

9. Sanitize surfaces and items that your guests are likely to share and touch frequently.

10. Reduce the risk of transmission for indoor gatherings by opening windows and keeping ventilation systems and air purifiers running. Air flow is the key to dispersing virus particles that could be in the gathering space.

Spending time with loved ones is important. You can ensure these gatherings are as safe as they are fun.

These 10 tips aren't new and they're not hard but they do make a difference.

Happy Mother's Day from One Yukon.
...

Message From the Chiefs
Current Situation

COVID-19 Still Present Across Yukon, Some Restrictions Remain in Effect

The coronavirus is still present in most Yukon communities, and it can still be dangerous, especially to someone who is immunocompromised, or has a pre-existing health condition. For this reason, a number of public health measures remain in place until further notice. For example, it is still mandatory to wear a mask in some locations, including schools, daycares, long-term care homes, health facilities, shelters, group homes, the correctional centre, and hospitals. You may also be required to wear a mask in some businesses and venues. For more information on the COVID-19 restrictions in effect across Yukon, click here.

Household Safety

What To Do if You, a Housemate or a Family Member Tests Positive

In the event that you or someone in your home or in your family tests positive, the first step is to self-isolate. The next step is to review federal and territorial guidance that will help you prevent further spread of the virus. Based on this guidance you can determine how long to isolate, when to seek medical attention, how to determine who may have been a close contact and more. If you have any questions or need assistance, click here or dial 8-1-1 for 24-hour health advice.

Vaccinations & Boosters

When Should I Get My Next Dose?

Here’s a chart to help you figure out the optimal time for your next dose. If you have any personal health questions or concerns, be sure to check with your doctor. You can also call 8-1-1 if you have general questions about COVID-19 vaccines.

Youth Vaccinations

Vaccine Information for Children Ages 5-11

Vaccines are the best protection against COVID-19 infection. Information for parents and guardians on the Pfizer vaccine for children ages 5-11 years old is now available on the Government of Yukon website. To read the handout, click here.

Current Restrictions & Recommendations

Is Proof of Vaccination Still Required?

Yes. Even though the State of Emergency was lifted in March, you may still be asked to show proof of vaccination in some settings. To get your proof of vaccination information, click here.

Current Restrictions & Recommendations

Understanding the Impacts of “Long COVID”

When people still show symptoms of COVID-19 for weeks or months after their initial recovery, it’s called post COVID-19 condition. It’s also known as long COVID. According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, there have been reports of more than 100 symptoms or difficulties with everyday activities following COVID-19 infections. About 80% of adults reported 1 or more symptoms in the short term (4 to 12 weeks after their initial COVID-19 infection). About 60% reported 1 or more symptoms in the long term (more than 12 weeks after their initial COVID-19 infection). And 10% said that they were also unable to return to work in the long term. To learn more, click here.

COMMUNITY TRAVEL PLANNER

Safe Travel Map

Click on your destination or the traditional territories you will be passing through to see the latest travel advisories for that area.
Community Travel
Stay Informed

Community Travel Directory

Prior to travelling, visit the websites and Facebook pages of the communities you’ll be visiting. Watch for COVID-19 updates including local public health measures, adjusted store hours, and openings/closures of facilities and attractions. If you plan to visit Yukon communities, please follow public health measures, stay safe and travel respectfully.

Provincial and Territorial Travel Requirements

Travelling Elsewhere in Canada

If you’re travelling outside of the Yukon but within Canada, visit these websites to see the latest COVID-19 restrictions and exemptions in effect when traveling to or through the provinces and territories:

For international travel, click here.

SPOTLIGHT: RAPID TESTING

Abbott PanBio Rapid Antigen Test
Abbott PanBio Instruction Sheet
BTNX Rapid Test
BTNX Instruction Sheet
Lucira Rapid Molecular Test
Lucira Instruction Sheet

Which Rapid Testing Options Are Available in my Community?

As of February 1, 2022, Yukon communities now have four rapid testing solutions available to help with COVID-19 detection:

Rapid tests are safe and less-invasive that standard PCR tests, and can provide results in just a few minutes. Encourage your friends and family to become familiar with all of the rapid testing options, recognizing that not all tests are alike, and access to some tests may be limited at times.

Searching For a Test?

Talk to your First Nation health representative about which tests are currently available in your community, and how to arrange for pick-up or delivery.

You can also contact the territorial agent in your community for more information about the Government of Yukon’s rapid testing program.

Your community Health Centre can also be a helpful resource if you have questions about rapid tests and/or PCR tests.

SOCIAL BUZZ

Here are some THINGS TO KNOW if you have Covid-19 right now.

📌 IT'S NOT YOUR FAULT
- This variant is very contagious.

- It's possible to become infected by someone who isn't symptomatic.

- The BA.2 variant is surviving much longer on surfaces than other strains.

📌 TESTING
- Using a rapid-antigen test will be most effective 2 - 4 days after your symptoms begin.

📌 GET A PCR TEST
- If you are eligible for a PCR test, get one. This lab-verified record provides proof of a past infection; helpful for travel or further healthcare.

📌 INFECTIOUS PERIOD
- You were likely infectious/contagious 2 days before you noticed your symptoms.

- You are not required to notify your close contacts BUT it's a good idea and a kindness.

- Vulnerable people who have been in contact with you, SHOULD definitely be advised.

📌 PLEASE TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF
- Symptoms can last 14 days. Even for mild cases and for fully vaccinated Yukoners.

- Resting is very IMPORTANT. Rest while you feel sick or fatigued and avoid overexertion when you start to feel better.

📌 TIMING
- Stay home for 7 days from the beginning of your symptoms.

- Wait 3 months to get your first or next Booster dose.

❓If you are concerned or worried about your symptoms or have questions about your condition, PLEASE CALL YOUR HEALTH CENTRE or seek medical care.
...

It's good for our mental health to connect, to gather and to celebrate.

Here's a list of 10 Tips to make it safer to do so... and not just on Mother's Day.

1. Stay home when you're sick. Even if your symptoms are mild.

2. Gather outdoors if you can. It's the lowest risk way to spend time with others.

3. Wear a mask, especially if you're gathering with vulnerable people. Elders, the unvaccinated, the immunocompromised and people who live in community settings need extra protection.

4. Plan to visit (especially Elders) in larger and well-ventilated spaces.

5. Keep your groups small. Limiting group size allows you to easily inform guests if transmission occurs.

6. Being vaccinated and boosted reduces the risk of severe illness and hospitalization, if you or your guests contract the virus.

7. Take a rapid test before you gather; it could help uncover a symptom-free infection (that still makes you contagious to others).

8. Wash your hands often. Use hand sanitizer before and after coming into contact with surfaces and objects in public places.

9. Sanitize surfaces and items that your guests are likely to share and touch frequently.

10. Reduce the risk of transmission for indoor gatherings by opening windows and keeping ventilation systems and air purifiers running. Air flow is the key to dispersing virus particles that could be in the gathering space.

Spending time with loved ones is important. You can ensure these gatherings are as safe as they are fun.

These 10 tips aren't new and they're not hard but they do make a difference.

Happy Mother's Day from One Yukon.
...

We honour all the mothers who have worked so hard, done so much and loved so fully this past year.

Mother's Day is a joyful one for many families.

Let's show love and kindness to those who are grieving the loss of their mothers.

Let's share love and kindness with the mothers who are grieving the loss of their child.

The Yukon is a caring place, full of caring people. Thank you for being one of them. ❤️
...

Omicron is just about everywhere and moving quickly through families and friend groups in the Yukon. It's trickier than ever to avoid being exposed and infected by the virus... not because people don't care and aren't being careful.

The spread is happening faster and more easily BECAUSE Omicron (and the BA.2 subvariant) is SUPER TRANSMISSIBLE. The virus has gotten better at evading our immune system and for most Yukoners, it's been over 12 months since their last shot.

Just know: We don't need to panic about Omicron. We need to GET OUR BOOSTERS and make sure we use our Covid smarts.

- Sanitize and mask up
- Avoid socializing in small spaces
- Limit the time you spend (indoors) with unvaccinated folks and immunocompromised folks
- Stay home when you're sick - even mildly sick
- Socialize outdoors

ABOUT OMICRON
"Because the Omicron variant is immune evasive, two doses of COVID-19 vaccines offer less protection against Omicron than against previous variants.

Fortunately, evidence shows that boosters can help increase antibody levels that wane over time after the second dose."
* Statement from the Chief Public Health Officer of Canada on April 22, 2022

Booster doses are available in all Yukon communities. Call your Health Centre to book an appointment for your booster.

The booster shot increases vaccine effectiveness to over 90% against severe outcomes. With a variant this contagious, it's important to DO ALL WE CAN to avoid serious illness and hospitalization.

Your health matters! You matter!
...

We'd much rather be thinking of chocolate, bunnies and brunch... but this message from Dr. Jesse Kancir is good too.

“With the long weekend approaching and increased COVID-19 risk across the Yukon, it’s as important as ever to consider your COVID-19 risk before attending a dinner party, cultural or faith-based gathering or other Easter or spring event."

Just so you know, folks: We're not trying to dampen your spirits on this beautiful weekend.

It's just that there lots of cases of this highly contagious BA.2 variant, across the Yukon.

Luckily, for most people, BA.2 feels a lot like a cold and if you're fully vaccinated, YOUR BODY WILL KNOW HOW TO TACKLE IT. You might feel yucky for 3 to 5 days or you might feel worse. PAY ATTENTION and get help if you need it.

Some folks don't develop any symptoms at all... this makes it really tricky to keep from spreading this dang bug to others.

As you know, BA.2 is airborne (light and floaty) so when you don't have symptoms but test positive, each breath releases virus particles.

You don't want to make anyone else sick so we've got a few suggestions to help:

1. Consider the vaccination status of those you plan to visit. Not everyone is protected from serious illness through the vaccine.

2. The more people, the greater the chance of encountering the virus. This variant is EARLY to spread, even before you develop symptoms. This is true among vaccinated people too.

3. Space: Is your gathering in a space that's big enough to ensure people can keep some distance from one another? BTW, outside is best. 😉

4. How long do you plan to hang out together? The longer anyone is exposed to virus particles in the air, the higher the chance of contracting Covid. Keep it short and sweet, unless you can be outside.

5. Most places can provide fresh air when windows are open and ventilation fans are on. It's really important to make sure you have air flow and air exchange so that the virus particles don't build up and gang up on you. Again, gathering outside is the best option.

Here's hoping that sunshine (and the Easter Bunny) finds you wherever you happen to be spending your long weekend.
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NEWS!! The Council of Yukon First Nations donates rapid molecular tests to the Yukon government!

These tests such as LUCIRA can be used to confirm Covid-19 within community health centres.

"This initiative by CYFN’s Yukon First Nation Covid Response Team will help to safeguard the health of community members by ensuring that Yukon First Nations across the Yukon have convenient and timely access to rapid molecular tests."
CYFN Grand Chief Peter Johnston

HOW DO THESE TESTS WORK?
Like PCR lab tests, Lucira’s test extracts viral genetic material and amplifies it. The swab only goes
...

The Ross River Dena Council has had a Level 5 Risk Level posted on its website for many days now.

As the RRDC does not have a Facebook account, we're sharing this in service of their government and their community.

From the RRDC Covid-19 Dashboard:

LEVEL 5 Indicates that there is at least one confirmed case of COVID-19 in Ross River and/or the risk of transmission in rural Yukon is extremely high.

Risk is elevated due to:
- current vaccination rates,
- the territorial case count is above 20 and
- there are possible cases and/or exposures in neighbouring communities.

Community-level safety measures are now in place to help mitigate the risk and prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Ross River.
...

People are thought to be most contagious early in the course of their illness. With Omicron, most transmission appears to occur during the one to two days before onset of symptoms, and in the two to three days afterwards.

People with no symptoms can also spread the coronavirus to others.

By the 10th day after COVID symptoms begin, most people will no longer be contagious, as long as their symptoms have continued to improve and their fever has resolved.

People who test positive for the virus but never develop symptoms over the following 10 days after testing are also probably no longer contagious.

According to the CDC’s isolation guidelines, everyone who tests positive for COVID-19 should isolate at home for five days if you have no symptoms or your symptoms are improving after five days, you can discontinue isolation and leave your home continue to wear a mask around others for five additional days.

If you have a fever, continue to isolate at home until you no longer have a fever.

You can use the CDC’s Quarantine and Isolation calculator to help determine when and how long you should stay home, get tested, and wear a mask around others if you have COVID-19 or were recently in close contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19.

Source: Harvard Health - March 29, 2022
...

This is really important information ⬇

"Without symptoms" can refer to two groups of people: those who eventually do have symptoms (pre-symptomatic) and those who never go on to have symptoms (asymptomatic). During this pandemic, we have seen that people without symptoms can spread the coronavirus infection to others.

A person with COVID-19 may be contagious 48 hours before starting to experience symptoms. In fact, people without symptoms may be more likely to spread the illness, because they are unlikely to be isolating and may not adopt behaviors designed to prevent spread.

But what about people who never go on to develop symptoms? A study published in JAMA Network Open found that almost one out of every four infections may be transmitted by individuals with asymptomatic infections. The proportion of asymptomatic transmission appears to be even higher with the Omicron variant.

Getting vaccinated and boosted once you are eligible is important for protecting not just yourself but others as well; evidence suggests that you're less likely to infect others, or may be contagious for a shorter period of time, once you've been vaccinated.

Source: Harvard Health, March 29, 2022
...

❓How soon after I'm infected with the new coronavirus will I start to be contagious?

The time from exposure to symptom onset (known as the incubation period) is thought to be two to 14 days. Symptoms typically appeared within five days for early variants, and within four days for the Delta variant. The incubation period appears to be even shorter – about three days – for the Omicron variant.

We know that people tend to be most infectious early in the course of their infection. With Omicron, most transmission occurs during the one to two days before onset of symptoms, and in the two to three days afterwards.

Wearing masks, particularly indoors, can help reduce the risk that someone who is infected but not yet experiencing symptoms may unknowingly infect others.

Source: Harvard Health - March 29, 2022
...

Here's the Q: Can a person who has been infected with coronavirus get infected again?

And here's the ANSWER:
The immune system responds to COVID-19 infection by stimulating white blood cells called lymphocytes to form antibodies that fight the infection.

These antibodies and lymphocytes retain a temporary protective effect against reinfection. But it is only temporary. There have been many confirmed cases of reinfection with COVID-19. In other words, a person got sick with COVID-19, recovered, and then became infected again.

This has been especially true as the coronavirus has mutated into COVID-19 variants. There was a rise in reinfections with the Delta variant, and an explosive increase in the reinfection rate due to the Omicron variant.

Omicron has about 50 mutations, including more than 30 mutations on the spike protein, the region of the virus that our immune systems recognize after previous infection. Because of this, Omicron is more capable than previous variants of evading our immune defenses and causing reinfection.

We have learned that vaccination plus a booster dose strengthens the natural immune response, even in those who have been previously infected, and further reduces the risk of reinfection.

Although breakthrough infections after vaccination are also more common with Omicron than previous variants, vaccination continues to protect well against severe illness.

The bottom line? Get vaccinated and boosted whether or not you’ve already had COVID-19.

March 29, 2022 - Harvard Health
...

And here's the response.

Now that the Omicron variant of COVID-19 is the dominant strain, telling the difference is more challenging than ever.

Even if you have been vaccinated and boosted, you can still get symptoms, but they are likely to be mild to moderate in severity. For those not vaccinated, the risk of severe symptoms that can be life-threatening is still substantial.

At the current time, people with "flulike" symptoms should assume they have COVID. If possible, arrange to get tested or do a home test. If the test is positive, you should isolate at home for five days.

If you had a negative test when symptoms started, it’s still best to isolate at home for two to three more days, to monitor your symptoms and prevent spreading infection. (That’s because there is a chance of false negatives with antigen tests, which means you can still have COVID with a negative test.)

Consider testing again before going out. Once you are ready to leave home, continue to consistently wear a mask for at least five more days.

Source: Harvard Health - If you've been exposed to the coronavirus (March 29, 2022)
...

Here's the ANSWER (Harvard Health)

Some people infected with the virus have no symptoms. When the virus does cause symptoms, common ones include fever, body ache, dry cough, fatigue, chills, headache, sore throat, loss of appetite, and loss of smell. In some people, COVID-19 causes more severe symptoms like high fever, severe cough, and shortness of breath, which often indicates pneumonia.

People with COVID-19 can also experience neurological symptoms, gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, or both. These may occur with or without respiratory symptoms.

For example, COVID-19 affects brain function in some people. Specific neurological symptoms seen in people with COVID-19 include loss of smell, inability to taste, muscle weakness, tingling or numbness in the hands and feet, dizziness, confusion, delirium, seizures, and stroke.

In addition, some people have gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, such as loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain or discomfort associated with COVID-19.

March 29, 2022 - Article: If you've been exposed to the coronavirus
...

Rapid Antigen Tests... oh so many feels.

Maybe you've tried using them once.
Maybe you've used tons of them.
Maybe you're frustrated.
And maybe they've been super helpful for you - when you need to know if that sniffle is your allergies or Covid.

Here are just a few tips to make your test as accurate as possible. Just remember to follow the instructions in the package for the specific test you use.

Tip #1: Blow your nose and make sure it's dry up there. Mucus will not test well... snot will affect your result.

Tip #2: Wash your hands and sanitize the surface you'll be using for testing.

Tip #3: Read the test instructions from start to finish, before you begin.

Tip #4: Swab: Start with your throat (20 seconds of swabbing) and then move to your nostrils - swab each side.
(Positive results tend to show up faster with combo-swabbing in the throat and nose)

Tip #5: Make sure you ONLY add the CORRECT number of drops indicated in the instructions. Too many or too few drops could affect your results.

Tip #6: Set a timer. Your results could be invalid if you check too soon or too late. 15 minutes means 15 minutes.

And now a little more about deciding WHEN to test.

This is tricky because so many factors can affect your incubation period, the timing of the onset of your symptoms and the viral load you're carrying.

So try this:
* Test when your symptoms show up BUT have more tests available. If you have a negative result, test again in 2 days.

* Test when you get notified that you've been exposed to a positive case.

* Test before you plan a visit or an event where vulnerable people will be in attendance.

* Test after (maybe for multiple days) after a large gathering where there was low ventilation, large groups, small space, close contact and possible covid exposure.

If you need a video to help you get through these instructions, we've got those too. Just drop us a comment and we'll be sure to reshare the video.
...

This post is all about helping your to figure out
AIR FLOW * VENTILATION * DISPERSION *
because many of you are or will be sharing a house with someone who has tested positive for Covid.

Note: Covid-19 virus particles are super tiny and float in the air for hours.

TIPS AND INFO for INDOOR AIR QUALITY

* Open windows and install a fan to draw OUT household air

* Use a humidifier because viruses don't transmit as well in moist air

* Run your bathroom fan or range hood fan or HVAC system often to exchange the household air

* Buy a portable air filtration system and use it in places with low ventilation but high usage

* Wear N95 masks and ensure the infectious person does too, when you do share space/AIR

* Wait 25 minutes (with a window open or fan on) before using a room that was occupied by the infectious person.

Other tips:
- Keep the infectious person in their own room as much as possible, keep them out of the kitchen and away from food prep tools

- Clean surfaces very often and wash your hands regularly

- Change masks frequently and limit your time and contact with this member of your household

This new omicron variant BA.2 is super transmissible.
It's all over the place in our communities and tricky to avoid.

🌟 It's kinda like dog fur on a white couch.
🌟 And it's kinda like the smell of burnt popcorn in the office.
🌟 And it's also like mosquitos on the first nice weekend of June.

But you've got this. And we've got more posts coming your way that we hope will make it as easy as possible to avoid this new variant.
...

You've seen that many Yukon residents continue to wear masks indoors and when there are lots of other people around.

Maybe you are someone who's made this choice too. AWESOME!

Students are required to wear masks at school and there are good reasons for that: lots of time is spent in classrooms; limited or unknown ventilation; talking and laughing; and 10 or more people in these spaces.

Check out this EXCELLENT ARTICLE on the site ELPAIS that shows exactly why wearing masks is STILL A SMART DECISION.

The graphics are soooo good.
...

Handle with Care

The liquid solution in home rapid testing kits contains a SMALL amount of chemical preservatives that can pose a danger if swallowed — particularly for children and pets.

There have been 50 calls to poison control centres across Canada asking about the risks of accidental ingestion of these liquids.

Just so you know, NONE have been serious but there is still a health concern and poison risk if this liquid is swallowed. It's not just water.

And just so you know, you can NOT get an accurate test result by replacing the liquid with saline solution, water or another liquid.

These tests are safe to use.

Compared to the 500 + calls that poison control centres receive each month, testing kits are not a big risk BUT we should handle these with care.

Here's what HEALTH CANADA 🇨🇦 recommends:

1. Keep rapid antigen test kits and solutions out of the reach of children and pets.

2. Do not swallow the solutions, and avoid eye and skin contact.

3. Wash hands thoroughly after use. If spillage occurs, rinse well with water.

4. Follow all instructions for proper disposal.

5. Report any health product-related side effects or complaints to Health Canada.

6. Contact your local poison information and control centre in cases of accidental ingestion of chemicals or direct skin exposure.

Here's the news story:
https://www.cbc.ca/news/health/50-calls-made-to-poison-control-centres-over-exposure-to-covid-19-rapid-test-kit-ingredients-1.6363237
...

SOUTHERN YUKON
Rapid tests are easy to pick up and it's worth having a few on hand BEFORE you may need to use one.

Here's a list of locations where Covid rapid antigen home testing kits are available.

🔔TAGISH & CARCROSS
**Carcross/Tagish First Nation Main Administration Building
Monday to Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Phone: 867-821-4251

🔔TESLIN & JOHNSON'S CROSSING
** Village of Teslin Office, 39 Nisutlin Drive
Monday to Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

🔔WATSON LAKE
** Watson Lake Territorial Agent
Tuesday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
...

Dr Raywat Deonandan, Epidemiologist talks about Living with COVID-19

One Yukon 9 views May 17, 2022 9:31 am

How to do the BTNX Rapid Response COVID-19 rapid antigen test with a throat + nasal swab sample

One Yukon 217 views January 31, 2022 12:13 am

How to do the Lucira rapid molecular test at home

One Yukon 19 views January 31, 2022 12:12 am

How to do the Abbott PanBIO COVID-19 rapid antigen test with a throat + nasal sample

One Yukon 1.7K views January 31, 2022 12:10 am

How to do the Roche SD Biosensor rapid antigen test with a throat + nasal swab sample.

One Yukon 109 views January 31, 2022 12:06 am

How to make Abbott Panbio rapid antigen test kits for your community

One Yukon 72 views December 24, 2021 4:12 pm

Dr. Smart, President of the CMA answers questions about the COVID-19 vaccine for 5-11 years old

One Yukon 53 views November 12, 2021 8:24 am

How to self-administer the Abbott Panbio Rapid Antigen Test

One Yukon 1.4K views November 2, 2021 11:58 pm

COVID-19 and factors that influence willingness to take the vaccine in Canada

One Yukon 11 views October 24, 2021 2:45 am

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

One Yukon

Here are some THINGS TO KNOW if you have Covid-19 right now. 

📌 ITS NOT YOUR FAULT
-  This variant is very contagious. 

-  Its possible to become infected by someone who isnt symptomatic.  

-  The BA.2 variant is surviving much longer on surfaces than other strains. 

📌  TESTING 
-  Using a rapid-antigen test will be most effective 2 - 4 days after your symptoms begin.

📌  GET A PCR TEST 
-  If you are eligible for a PCR test, get one.  This lab-verified record provides proof of a past infection; helpful for travel or further healthcare. 

📌  INFECTIOUS PERIOD
-  You were likely infectious/contagious 2 days before you noticed your symptoms.  

-  You are not required to notify your close contacts BUT its a good idea and a kindness.  

-  Vulnerable people who have been in contact with you, SHOULD definitely be advised. 

📌  PLEASE TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF
-  Symptoms can last 14 days.  Even for mild cases and for fully vaccinated Yukoners. 

-  Resting is very IMPORTANT.  Rest while you feel sick or fatigued and avoid overexertion when you start to feel better. 

📌  TIMING 
-  Stay home for 7 days from the beginning of your symptoms. 

-  Wait 3 months to get your first or next Booster dose. 

❓If you are concerned or worried about your symptoms or have questions about your condition, PLEASE CALL YOUR HEALTH CENTRE or seek medical care.

Here are some THINGS TO KNOW if you have Covid-19 right now.

📌 IT'S NOT YOUR FAULT
- This variant is very contagious.

- It's possible to become infected by someone who isn't symptomatic.

- The BA.2 variant is surviving much longer on surfaces than other strains.

📌 TESTING
- Using a rapid-antigen test will be most effective 2 - 4 days after your symptoms begin.

📌 GET A PCR TEST
- If you are eligible for a PCR test, get one. This lab-verified record provides proof of a past infection; helpful for travel or further healthcare.

📌 INFECTIOUS PERIOD
- You were likely infectious/contagious 2 days before you noticed your symptoms.

- You are not required to notify your close contacts BUT it's a good idea and a kindness.

- Vulnerable people who have been in contact with you, SHOULD definitely be advised.

📌 PLEASE TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF
- Symptoms can last 14 days. Even for mild cases and for fully vaccinated Yukoners.

- Resting is very IMPORTANT. Rest while you feel sick or fatigued and avoid overexertion when you start to feel better.

📌 TIMING
- Stay home for 7 days from the beginning of your symptoms.

- Wait 3 months to get your first or next Booster dose.

❓If you are concerned or worried about your symptoms or have questions about your condition, PLEASE CALL YOUR HEALTH CENTRE or seek medical care.
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4 days ago
UNFORTUNATELY, having had Covid-19 doesnt mean ONE-and-DONE.  

In the U.K., the reinfection rate is close to 10%.  In the Yukon, its hard to know for sure but most of us know at least one person whos had Covid twice. 

Its not an uncommon scenario: Omicron in December of 2021 and then infection with the BA.2 variant in April 2022.  One factor is waning immunity.  

For a healthy and vaccinated Yukoner, a case of Covid will likely be mild.  Their immune system will know how to respond and will neutralize the virus.  The big issue is that the period of time that someone is infectious begins two days before symptoms do... so theyre likely spreading the virus particles wherever they go.  

Thats why its such an act of kindness to wear a mask in public places and to keep your distance, especially in small or crowded spaces.  Better yet, avoid crowded, poorly-ventilated indoor spaces for your own health (and SANITY) as well as for others protection. 

90 DAYS
For a period of about 90 days after an infection, the immune system will be primed to respond again (and quickly) so immunity is considered higher for that period of time. 

GOALS
Since the goal isnt to prevent ALL CASES (since we know that isnt possible), whats the point of any of this?  

A virus as stealthy and airborne as this Omicron variant, means that you (we) focus on:

1.  Staying up to date on your vaccines SO THAT you limit your chance of getting Covid and transmitting it to a vulnerable person such as someone with diabetes, a heart condition, organ transplant, Rheumatoid arthritis, Crohns disease, kidney disease, certain cancers, HIV/AIDS, etc.

2.  Staying home when sick... and taking care of ourselves.  Since it takes a few days to detect Covid, dont assume its just a cold youve got. 

*** NEWSFLASH: NO ONE WANTS YOUR COLD OR FLU OR ANY VIRUS so dont be that person who goes out when theyre sick. Regardless of the type of illness, STAYING HOME IS JUST GOOD MANNERS. 

3.  Limiting your exposure to covid infection(s) MATTERS.  Heres why.  The percentage of covid cases that lead to LONG COVID is as high as 40%.  Not joking.  Even mild cases lead to long covid at this same rate.  Yikes. 

4.  Staying healthy (masking, hand hygiene, etc) is WORTH IT because what we keep hearing is that lots of people (even those who are fully vaccinated and boosted) need 14 DAYS TO RECOVER, even from a mild case. 

This isnt just about bad news and scary stats.  Research, studies and information about Covid-19 is being released often and while it can seem overwhelming, theres always something helpful we can take and apply to our lives. 

A BIT MORE ABOUT TESTING AND CONTAGIOUS PERIODS: 
  
* Tests are working to detect BA.2 but home antigen tests pick up the virus a few days after symptoms begin.  

Heres the MATH: 
2 DAYS (contagious but no symptoms) + 2.5 DAYS (contagious, symptomatic but viral load too low for test) = about 5 DAYS OF BEING CONTAGIOUS BEFORE KNOWING ITS COVID.

Thats 5 DAYS of releasing virus particles into the air JUST FROM BREATHING.  Thats why weve got your back and respect your choice to WEAR A MASK, because we know that you care about keeping other Yukoners safe.

UNFORTUNATELY, having had Covid-19 doesn't mean "ONE-and-DONE".

In the U.K., the reinfection rate is close to 10%. In the Yukon, it's hard to know for sure but most of us know at least one person who's had Covid twice.

It's not an uncommon scenario: Omicron in December of 2021 and then infection with the BA.2 variant in April 2022. One factor is waning immunity.

For a healthy and vaccinated Yukoner, a case of Covid will likely be mild. Their immune system will know how to respond and will neutralize the virus. The big issue is that the period of time that someone is infectious begins two days before symptoms do... so they're likely spreading the virus particles wherever they go.

That's why it's such an act of kindness to wear a mask in public places and to keep your distance, especially in small or crowded spaces. Better yet, avoid crowded, poorly-ventilated indoor spaces for your own health (and SANITY) as well as for others' protection.

90 DAYS
For a period of about 90 days after an infection, the immune system will be primed to respond again (and quickly) so immunity is considered higher for that period of time.

GOALS
Since the goal isn't to prevent ALL CASES (since we know that isn't possible), what's the point of any of this?

A virus as stealthy and airborne as this Omicron variant, means that you (we) focus on:

1. Staying up to date on your vaccines SO THAT you limit your chance of getting Covid and transmitting it to a vulnerable person such as someone with diabetes, a heart condition, organ transplant, Rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, kidney disease, certain cancers, HIV/AIDS, etc.

2. Staying home when sick... and taking care of ourselves. Since it takes a few days to detect Covid, don't assume it's just a cold you've got.

*** NEWSFLASH: NO ONE WANTS YOUR COLD OR FLU OR ANY VIRUS so don't be that person who goes out when they're sick. Regardless of the type of illness, STAYING HOME IS JUST GOOD MANNERS.

3. Limiting your exposure to covid infection(s) MATTERS. Here's why. The percentage of covid cases that lead to LONG COVID is as high as 40%. Not joking. Even mild cases lead to long covid at this same rate. Yikes.

4. Staying healthy (masking, hand hygiene, etc) is WORTH IT because what we keep hearing is that lots of people (even those who are fully vaccinated and boosted) need 14 DAYS TO RECOVER, even from a mild case.

This isn't just about bad news and scary stats. Research, studies and information about Covid-19 is being released often and while it can seem overwhelming, there's always something helpful we can take and apply to our lives.

A BIT MORE ABOUT TESTING AND CONTAGIOUS PERIODS:

* Tests are working to detect BA.2 but home antigen tests pick up the virus a few days after symptoms begin.

Here's the MATH:
2 DAYS (contagious but no symptoms) + 2.5 DAYS (contagious, symptomatic but viral load too low for test) = about 5 DAYS OF BEING CONTAGIOUS BEFORE KNOWING IT'S COVID.

That's 5 DAYS of releasing virus particles into the air JUST FROM BREATHING. That's why we've got your back and respect your choice to WEAR A MASK, because we know that you care about keeping other Yukoners safe.
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1 week ago
Thanks to Nova Scotia for posting about new symptoms that could be covid-19, even if youve had it previously.

We have more about REINFECTION coming soon.  This info ⬇️ gives good advice about TESTING. 

Heres MORE from the Nova Scotia Health website:

Additional COVID-19 testing is usually not recommended for someone who has recovered from COVID-19 in the past 90 days (3 months).

During this time, you may have some short-term post-infection immunity. However, with the Omicron variant, there is uncertainty about how this immunity lasts. Some people do become sick with COVID-19 again during the 90-day period, and the risk goes up the closer you are to the end of the three months.

Therefore, if you develop new symptoms in these 3 months, stay home until symptoms have been improving for at least 24 hours (or 48 hours if you have gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea or vomiting) and you don’t have a fever.

You may choose to take a rapid test, particularly if you are nearing the end of the three months. If you test positive, you should consider this a new case and self-isolate for 7 days. If the test is negative, a second rapid test is recommended 48 hours later, and you should stay home until you are feeling better even if you continue to test negative.

PCR testing is not recommended within three months of recovery as it may continue to detect the old virus.

If you recovered from COVID-19 more than three months ago, follow the instructions based on whether there is a case in your household, you were exposed outside of your household, or you do not know if you were exposed.

https://www.nshealth.ca/i-have-covid-19-symptoms?fbclid=IwAR1XMuFRpm6OKaGt27IK6OUtuLvBTRJ-1PEGkKUDZ1I6pkh4jlx7KMXA_BM

Thanks to Nova Scotia for posting about new symptoms that could be covid-19, even if you've had it previously.

We have more about REINFECTION coming soon. This info ⬇️ gives good advice about TESTING.

Here's MORE from the Nova Scotia Health website:

"Additional COVID-19 testing is usually not recommended for someone who has recovered from COVID-19 in the past 90 days (3 months).

During this time, you may have some short-term post-infection immunity. However, with the Omicron variant, there is uncertainty about how this immunity lasts. Some people do become sick with COVID-19 again during the 90-day period, and the risk goes up the closer you are to the end of the three months.

Therefore, if you develop new symptoms in these 3 months, stay home until symptoms have been improving for at least 24 hours (or 48 hours if you have gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea or vomiting) and you don’t have a fever.

You may choose to take a rapid test, particularly if you are nearing the end of the three months. If you test positive, you should consider this a new case and self-isolate for 7 days. If the test is negative, a second rapid test is recommended 48 hours later, and you should stay home until you are feeling better even if you continue to test negative.

PCR testing is not recommended within three months of recovery as it may continue to detect the old virus.

If you recovered from COVID-19 more than three months ago, follow the instructions based on whether there is a case in your household, you were exposed outside of your household, or you do not know if you were exposed."

www.nshealth.ca/i-have-covid-19-symptoms?fbclid=IwAR1XMuFRpm6OKaGt27IK6OUtuLvBTRJ-1PEGkKUDZ1I6pkh...COVID-19 is constantly evolving, and our understanding of the virus evolves with each new variant. Public Health recommendations are updated as needed to support new evidence, with the goal of slowing the spread of the virus.

As with previous variants of COVID-19, you may have some short-term post-infection immunity in the first 90-days after you’ve recovered, and additional testing is usually not recommended.

However, with the Omicron variant, immunity is thought to decrease as time goes on. You may choose to take a rapid test, particularly if you develop new symptoms near the end of the 90 days. If you test positive, you should consider this a new case and self-isolate for 7 days. If the test is negative, a second rapid test is recommended 48 hours later. If both tests are negative, or you choose not to test, stay home until symptoms are improving.

PCR testing is not recommended within three months of recovery as it may continue to detect the old virus.

Learn more at www.nshealth.ca/i-have-covid-19-symptoms
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1 week ago
Its good for our mental health to connect, to gather and to celebrate.  

Heres a list of 10 Tips to make it safer to do so... and not just on Mothers Day.  

1.  Stay home when youre sick.  Even if your symptoms are mild.  

2.  Gather outdoors if you can.  Its the lowest risk way to spend time with others.  

3.  Wear a mask, especially if youre gathering with vulnerable people.  Elders, the unvaccinated, the immunocompromised and people who live in community settings need extra protection. 

4.  Plan to visit (especially Elders) in larger and well-ventilated spaces.

5.  Keep your groups small.  Limiting group size allows you to easily inform guests if transmission occurs. 

6.  Being vaccinated and boosted reduces the risk of severe illness and hospitalization, if you or your guests contract the virus. 

7.  Take a rapid test before you gather; it could help uncover a symptom-free infection (that still makes you contagious to others). 

8.  Wash your hands often.  Use hand sanitizer before and after coming into contact with surfaces and objects in public places.

9.  Sanitize surfaces and items that your guests are likely to share and touch frequently. 

10.  Reduce the risk of transmission for indoor gatherings by opening windows and keeping ventilation systems and air purifiers running.  Air flow is the key to dispersing virus particles that could be in the gathering space. 

Spending time with loved ones is important.  You can ensure these gatherings are as safe as they are fun.  

These 10 tips arent new and theyre not hard but they do make a difference. 

Happy Mothers Day from One Yukon.

It's good for our mental health to connect, to gather and to celebrate.

Here's a list of 10 Tips to make it safer to do so... and not just on Mother's Day.

1. Stay home when you're sick. Even if your symptoms are mild.

2. Gather outdoors if you can. It's the lowest risk way to spend time with others.

3. Wear a mask, especially if you're gathering with vulnerable people. Elders, the unvaccinated, the immunocompromised and people who live in community settings need extra protection.

4. Plan to visit (especially Elders) in larger and well-ventilated spaces.

5. Keep your groups small. Limiting group size allows you to easily inform guests if transmission occurs.

6. Being vaccinated and boosted reduces the risk of severe illness and hospitalization, if you or your guests contract the virus.

7. Take a rapid test before you gather; it could help uncover a symptom-free infection (that still makes you contagious to others).

8. Wash your hands often. Use hand sanitizer before and after coming into contact with surfaces and objects in public places.

9. Sanitize surfaces and items that your guests are likely to share and touch frequently.

10. Reduce the risk of transmission for indoor gatherings by opening windows and keeping ventilation systems and air purifiers running. Air flow is the key to dispersing virus particles that could be in the gathering space.

Spending time with loved ones is important. You can ensure these gatherings are as safe as they are fun.

These 10 tips aren't new and they're not hard but they do make a difference.

Happy Mother's Day from One Yukon.
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2 weeks ago
We honour all the mothers who have worked so hard, done so much and loved so fully this past year.  

Mothers Day is a joyful one for many families.   

Lets show love and kindness to those who are grieving the loss of their mothers. 

Lets share love and kindness with the mothers who are grieving the loss of their child. 

The Yukon is a caring place, full of caring people.  Thank you for being one of them. ❤️

We honour all the mothers who have worked so hard, done so much and loved so fully this past year.

Mother's Day is a joyful one for many families.

Let's show love and kindness to those who are grieving the loss of their mothers.

Let's share love and kindness with the mothers who are grieving the loss of their child.

The Yukon is a caring place, full of caring people. Thank you for being one of them. ❤️
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2 weeks ago

Timeline photosHas it been 2 months or more since your child’s first #CovidVaccine dose?

Getting the second dose is important, even for children previously infected with #COVID19. Vaccination helps lower the risk of severe illness and hospitalization from COVID-19 in children 5 to 11 years old.

Vaccination after infection helps improve the immune response and may provide better, longer-lasting protection against other variants of the virus.

If your child recently had COVID-19, it’s suggested to wait:
👉 2 months after symptoms started
👉 2 months after testing positive if they didn’t experience any symptoms

For credible information and the most up to date facts, visit:
ow.ly/4cm850IB5Pe
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2 weeks ago

Photos from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's post ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

Novavax, a non-mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, is now available to all Yukoners 18 years of age and older. Learn more: yukon.ca/en/news/novavax-nuvaxovid-covid-19-vaccine-now-available ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago
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Yukon Updates

YUKON'S COVID-19 RESPONSE

Quick Links

Programming

COVID-19 Dashboard

The Government of Yukon’s new COVID-19 Dashboard provides case count data, test positivity rates, vaccination and hospitalization data, historical data and more. Updated daily from Monday-Friday. To view the Dashboard click here.

COVID-19 Updates Playlist

To watch any of the Government of Yukon’s COVID-19 Updates from March 12, 2020 to present, select the playlist menu on the video above, or click here.

Latest COVID-19 Update
State of Emergency

State of Emergency No Longer in Effect

Yukon lifted its State of Emergency on March 16, 2022. A State of Emergency was declared on November 13, 2021 and extended on February 3, 2022) under the Civil Emergency Measures Act. A number of restrictions have been lifted, however Yukoners and visitors are being asked to continue following territorial, regional and community-level safety measures as a way to help slow the spread of COVID-19 and prevent the health care system from becoming overwhelmed.

Restrictions & Recommendations

Most Restrictions Lifted, But Some Remain

The Yukon Government asks that residents and visitors continue to follow the current COVID-19 Safety Restrictions, as recommended by Chief Medical Officer of Health. The Government of Yukon’s schedule for lifting these temporary health measures is available here.

Announcements

Latest COVID-19 News Releases

The Government of Yukon has significantly reduced the number of news releases related to COVID-19, however there may be some new announcements from time to time. For a summary of recent news releases and video updates, click here.

Forging Ahead

Forging Ahead: Yukon’s Continuing Response to COVID-19

Released in 2021, Forging Ahead was developed to guide the way forward as we adapt to living with COVID-19 risk. The Government of Yukon will continue to support Yukoners and manage the next steps following the lifting of the State of Emergency. To see the plan, click here. To view the infographic, click here.

COVID-19 Risk

As public health measures ease, it’s important to assess your own COVID-19 risk when attending a gathering, event or group activity. These 5 key factors can help you assess your risk: Vaccination status, people, space, time and place. To assess your risk, follow this chart or click here for more information.

VACCINATION DATA

Vaccinations

Data provided by the Government of Yukon
Updated daily Monday to Friday

Vaccinations by Community

Data provided by the Government of Yukon
Updated daily Monday to Friday

Hospitalizations

Data provided by the Government of Yukon
Updated daily Monday to Friday

National Updates

CANADA'S COVID-19 RESPONSE

Quick Links

Programming

Interactive Data Visualization of COVID-19 in Canada

This interactive data map of COVID-19 in Canada shows the number of active, recovered and total cases, tests and deaths over time for province and territories.

Current Vaccination Coverage Across Canada

This interactive data map illustrates current vaccination coverage in all provinces and territories.

Why Get A Booster Dose?
Mental Health & Wellness
COVID-19 Support

COVID-19: Financial Support for People, Businesses and Organizations

The Government of Canada is taking immediate and significant action through the Canada’s COVID-19 Economic Response Plan to support people, businesses and organizations facing hardship as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak. Learn more

Vaccinations

Ask the Experts COVID-19 Vaccine Questions

Canadian medical professionals answer questions about the approval and use of MRNA vaccines, along with questions about benefits and effectiveness of the different vaccines and questions on vaccine safety, ingredients and side effects. Click here to see the videos and transcripts.

Data & Trends

Provincial, Territorial and International Reporting

Monitor the latest COVID-19 data, reporting and trends for all Canadian provinces and territories along with recognized international health organizations: